Normal day for Rik.

Along with The Goodies, Mel Smith and Griff Rhys Jones (I was never struck on Rowan Atkinson — too grotesque, too broad, and the global popularity of Mr Bean will forever be lost on me, if only because he reminds me — in dress, appearance and demeanour — of an old French teacher of mine)and Laurel and Hardy, Rik Mayall was one of my first comedy heroes — and it’s a curious thing that his work has dated far more quickly than any of the others. The Goodies’ robust slapstick, rooted in seventies surrealism but enjoyable in any subsequent decade…


Quoting a song, not so much.

Last month, I finished my second novel, Jukebox Paradiso. It’s available on Amazon. You should definitely buy it.

Because parts of the book take place in the late seventies and early eighties, when the Mod revival sparked a sudden resurgence of interest in all things sixties, I included short excerpts from some 1960s hits in the manuscript, almost without thinking. Mostly to add a bit of colour, texture and atmosphere to the events therein, but also because the lyrics I’d chosen amplified and illuminated the themes behind the story.

Now, I’m not stupid and…


You can now buy my second novel in paperback form or as an E-book from Amazon.

England, 1985. Jay Latimer — the singer, songwriter and guitarist with The Scarlet Empire — is about to embark on a solo career on the advice of his manager, who seems certain that Jay could crack the lucrative American market with a minimum of effort.

A music industry veteran at the tender age of twenty-six, Jay throws himself in at the deep end, sink or swim…

Tom Ronson follows his acclaimed debut novel CAUGHT JESTER with a warts-and-all exposé of the peaks and troughs of the music industry during the Thatcher / Reagan era — a time when excess equalled success, bigger was better, hubris and cocaine walked hand-in-hand, and MTV could make or break an artist overnight.


Almost as soon as Caught Jester went on sale last year and people started reading it, I became aware that I’d hit a few bumps along the way. Someone on Facebook offered their services as a proofreader, which made me think ‘Bloody cheek — do they think I haven’t read and re-read this thing several times over?’ Then someone else asked ‘So, did (character’s name removed to avoid spoiler) work in (spoiler removed) or did she (spoiler removed)? Only the book doesn’t make that clear.’ …


Well, maybe not so much ‘a cautionary tale’ as a demonstration of how the best intentions can often lead to the worst results imaginable. Or maybe I really am that horrible, worthless child my mother so often loudly insisted that I was, taking sadistic pleasure from the misfortunes of others. You decide.

The Garrick Theatre. Probably the most ‘Muppet Show’ theatre in London, in a good way.

Back in the autumn of 2019, shortly before we were plunged into the global nightmare of the Coronavirus pandemic, I went to a matinee performance of Michael Frayn’s legendary farce Noises Off at London’s Garrick Theatre. Those who know me well will tell you that I am hardly…


One of the best records ever.

Whilst working on a new project, I’ve been listening to a lot of music from the sixties, including an excellent Northern Soul ‘allnighter’ that’s on YouTube. This naturally led me to the much-derided Mod revival of the late seventies and early eighties, which threw up some very fine groups and singles and also a lot of rubbish, but I’ve often said that every family tree bears the occasional rotten fruit, and the bad apples help us to appreciate the good. But enough of these grocery-based similes.

When I was about six, and the Mod revival of the early eighties was…


I’m going to be on BBC Radio Northampton on Monday morning (22nd March) between 11am and 12noon (UK time) talking about my lovely book. Prepare to bore yourselves silly listening to my monotonous drone, and who knows? You might learn something.

Buy the book here, or if you’re based in the US or Canada, here.

Available now from Amazon!

Earlier today, I was thinking about the strange business of book signings. It must be a deeply weird sensation to sit on full public view in front of a shop full of strangers, signing your name over and over again. Like Glen Campbell song, ‘getting cards and letters from people I don’t even know’. I’m not sure that I could do it, which sounds absolutely perverse because I once earned a crust as a stand-up comedian (which I wasn’t very good at) and as a street musician (at which I did quite well), neither of which are exactly favoured occupations…


Although history has the Two Ronnies down as a cosy show that was consistently popular and attracted huge viewing figures throughout its sixteen-year run, this isn’t entirely the case. 1982 in particular was a bit of a precarious time for the Two Ronnies, and not only because there were plenty of snotty young comedy upstarts in town with their own politically aware agenda and a manic desire to ruffle feathers wherever they went.

Ronnie Barker had written a silent comedy for the duo, By the Sea. It was very much a pet project for Barker, his attempt at capturing the…


For various reasons, I’ve been thinking a lot about Steptoe and Son recently — the fondly remembered but oddly seldom celebrated ground-breaking sitcom about the love-hate relationship between a common-as-muck rag and bone man and his pretentious son. The fiftieth anniversary of the series in 2012 passed without much fuss or fanfare, and the sixtieth anniversary next year seems destined to slip under the radar in a similar fashion. …

Tom Ronson

I write, I try to amuse people, but mostly I stumble blindly from one disaster to the next. I have contributed to various 'outsider' publications.

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